happy feet

growing up in Athens, the first survival skill you develop is paying close attention to your feet. You have to look closely where you step or you’ll find yourself in a hole all the way down to China — left there by civil servants that called it a day before finishing up the job. So, you look down.

Looking at your feet is something you don’t just give up when you move to a city with real sidewalks. That’s why, when I first came to Ann Arbor I kept finding money on the ground. It’s not that I was lucky. It’s that nobody else looked down to see it first.

Looking at your feet is just a step away from taking pictures of your feet. Trust me it’s not a foot fetish, it tells the story of the places you walk.

I remember lounging around with my friend Solero on the beach of some Greek island and she took a picture of our feet against the emerald green background of the sea. That was my favorite picture of that summer. So I kept doing it, I kept taking pictures of the image Athenians see most, of the steps I took and the places they took me.

A few days ago Thetis sent me this link because she knows I was always taking these kinds of pictures myself. Although I’m not as good as this professional photographer (we’ve been over this so many times: having a camera doesn’t make you a photographer), I made a compilation of a few of them.

Life certainly keeps you on your toes.


5 Comments

Filed under Pictorials, Traveling around the world

5 responses to “happy feet

  1. I like so much taking photos of my feet. My friend Afrodite does it too, especially when she travels. Her “travelling feet” have traveled almost all around the world.
    Another interesting project that I’ve seen is this couple who always takes pictures of their feet.
    http://www.jenny.gr/2012/01/feet-travelling/#more-36206
    I think it’s a nice way to capture memories.🙂

  2. Now that I’m going through the photos, maybe it’s the same couple like the one on Thetis’ link. Anyway… Great idea!!!

  3. Γιάννα

    Keep walking (and being a witness to life’s small and larger miracles). Greetings from Athens, where we now look up, expecting the sky to fall on our heads at any moment.

  4. Finding money on the street reminds me of my elderly colleague at university. His daily commutes deliberately included much extra walking, and inevitably he would find a lot of money. But he had a serious problem – he was a pack rat too. His office overflowed with the collected debris – to the point where there was no space to meet with students. At one point, the fire marshal even threatened to shut us down. I have not seen much of him since my retirement over a decade ago. But I hear he still prowls the streets, collecting his money.

  5. writersblokc

    I like the idea, there’s something childish and almost playful about it. The Vermont ones are my favorite because of their laid-backness and the one from the New York fashion week because it works as a sort of fashion statement.
    I’m surprised that no one else has written it so far, so I’ll state the obvious: keep walking.

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